Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
CNNW 5
MSNBCW 4
CSPAN 3
MSNBC 3
CNN 1
CSPAN2 1
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the wealthy and quote, sticks the middle class with the bill. so with 29 days to go until the fiscal cliff, what would it take to get a deal? joining me now, men on opposite sides, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform and robert reish, former secretary of labor for president bill clinton and the author of "beyond outrage." none of the three of us are beyond outrage, grover norquist, which is why i keep having you back. the situation it seems to me as an impartial observer here is that both sides have now made fairly ludicrous offers that they know the other side is never going to accept in a million years. that does beg the question, grover, why bother, given that both sides know where they need to move, why the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so
president obama has seen these polls. so if there is a fiscal cliff and we go over it, the american public are likely to blame the republicans. >> well, that's absolutely true, piers. we've had an election and the clearest debate and the clearest difference in that election was over the question of whether the rich should pay more and tax rates should go up on the rich. everybody who paid any attention at all knows that the top 2% are now taking home a larger share of total income and wealth in this country than they have in over 80 years and are paying the lowest effective tax rate they paid in over a half a century. we also have a looming budget deficit. so you don't have to really be a rocket scientist to understand that the rich do have to pay more. taxes do have to be raised on the rich and i think that's why over 60% of the public in these polls are not only supportive of a tax increase on the rich, but also will blame the republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. and this gives frankly, this gives the white house and this gives the obama administration much more bargaining leverag
will not play that game. >> tonight, democratic whip steny hoyer gives me the latest fiscal cliff developments and the democratic line on medicare. tom perriello from the center of american progress action fund on how democrats can deal with republicans who can't deal with reality. rubio and ryan reload with a new message for the middle class. >> both parties tend to divide americans into our voters and their voters. >> but there is no escaping their own policies. >> we're going to a majority of takers versus makers in america. >> dnc chair debbie wasserman schultz responds tonight. plus, senator barbara boxer on her new plan for national polling place standards. and a new poll shows half of all republicans think the defunct group a.c.o.r.n. stole the election from president obama. >> that's an eye opener. >> i wonder where they ever got that idea? >> you just have to wait and see what happens. >>> good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. here is are the latest. republicans are at a stalemate with the white house for debt negotiations. republicans really only have two opti
really avert the fiscal cliff 4908% of american families, at least when it comes to income tax. and it's necessary. we know what happened over the last several decades when it comes to progressivity, income inequality in our country. it's the worst it's been in almost 90 years. through 1980 and 2005, in a 25 year period in time, more than 80% of total increase of american income went to the wealthiest 1%. since the recession ended, more than 90% of the income growth in america has gone to the top 1%, while the media income to the middle class has declined to i could go on and give illustrations. i don't think i need to. at least to this group, but i will tell you when we address the issue of revenue and taxes, i have insisted in every meeting i've been in from simpson-bowles to all the games, but it has to at least protect their current progressivity of the tax code, if not improved for those of lower income categories. i think that's a starting principle for those. the second thing is that we must insist on is to protect the safety net for america. make no mistake. as good as we are t
americans sent us to do. >> you mentioned the fiscal cliff and i want to ask you about it. president obama even in his p - proposal yesterday had entitlement cuts including to medicare. you have in the past been resistant to cutting entit entitlements. does the result of the election -- i've heard many people on the democratic side say, look, we won. we don't need to make concess n concessions to republicans on entitlements. we can raise the top rates without making these concessions. do you think the president is even in this first proposal giving away too much on the entitlement side? >> i think it's important to note that there's a difference between working to cut medicare and protecting the benefits. and itch said repeatedly that i will not vote to cut the benefits people have earned and depend on because they put those benefits into place, one, this in the middle of a depression, social security, and the other one, medicare, because they were needed. republicans and democrats recognized they needed these programs because people got old and people got sick and they still do. so i wi
for these fiscal cliff talks. back to your phone calls. good morning, doris. caller: good morning. the plan that the republicans offered, this is just the romney-ryan plan that the american voters said no to. other than destroying our earned benefit, i do not call them entitlements because we worked hard and we earned them. there are no specifics. what loopholes will they close? of course, they are going to punish the poor and middle- class. their plan still gives another huge tax cut to the 1%. people need to look at what happened to this country between fdr and nixon. look at what happened with the conservative takeover from nixon until now. host: we are going to have congressman tom cole from oklahoma who last week said in a closed-door meeting that they should agree with president obama and extend the tax cuts for middle-class americans and then fight later on for that tax cut for the wealthy. we will ask him about this latest proposal, the counterproposal from the house republicans. j.d. on twitter says -- on our republican , richard from colorado springs, colorado. caller: c-span coul
, then they're going to risk the whole economy in going over the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's sustainable. i don't think people fully understand, what the president is saying is 100% of american families and small businesses get continued tax relief on their first $250,000 in income, and on the income above that amount, higher income people would be paying the same rates they did during the clinton administration, which is four more cents on the dollar. and, again, i don't think that's at all unreasonable. the president talked about this at length during the presidential campaign, and i believe -- i think people like tom cole, a conservative republican in oklahoma had it right when he warned his colleagues they would look totally obstructionist if they allowed that to happen. >> congressman, also included in the president's plan was that $200 billion in new stimulus measures. mention the word stimulus to republicans, and, well, they're not too happy with that word. so why do that? why deliberately like -- it seems like it was a deliberate poke in the side. >> no, carol. this
on the proposal that was offered by the white house on the fiscal cliff. this is jon. independent line. hello. caller: hello. first of all, happy holidays. not sure. happy holidays, anyway. second of all, you people are journalists. you people are true journalists. i watch every day of the week. and one more thing, that fool that called yesterday, must be a product of inbreeding the way -- i don't know how they let him in. host: before we go back to yesterday, what do you think of the proposal today? >> caller: well, you don't know what they do behind closed doors. what they put out to the public is one thing and from both parties. they both have a little spin here and there. politicians to me, ha, i could tell you a story that happened when i was a kid in the 1950's. i'm originally from new york and some woman asked a politics who was running, why should i vote for you? and he said outright, because time biggest crook in this neighborhood and that guy was always voted in all the time because he was honest. we don't know what goes on behind closed doors. people are getting all worked up about
and work with both parties to find common ground. solving the fiscal cliff in a manner that addresses the true drivers of our debt and saves american jobs is a great way for the president to start his second term. and for the good of our country, and my colleagues, we're ready to work with the president to achieve those goals. >> mr. speaker, couple things. first, on the issue of tax rates, are you willing to accept no deal that includes some increase in those top tax rates? and i'm also wondering what our final deadline is on this? when do we really have to have a deal? >> increasing tax rates draws money away from our economy that needs to be invested in our economy to put the american people back to work. it's the wrong approach. we're willing to put revenues on the table, but revenues that come from closing loopholes, getting rid of special interest deductions, and not raising rates. we think it's better for the economy. pure and simple. secondly, the american people expect us to find common ground, to work together, and to resolve this. and frankly, sooner is better than later. >
-called fiscal cliff is a solvable problem. critical as the holidays approach and businesses make investment and hiring decisions for next year. while polls show many americans are pessimistic, there's optimism in this home. >> i got a sense that he's confident that what's best for the american people will happen. >> yeah. >> reporter: you agree? >> yes. >> i do too. >> reporter: but for now, the gop's resisting any tax increases even on those upper income americans. house republicans of course have made the counteroffer with $800 billion in new revenue and an overhaul of the tax code. wolf, they feel as if they have moved the ball, but they don't believe that the president is interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> these negotiations, dan, they usually go until the bitter, bitter end. a lot of folks are assuming that before that end there will be a deal. give us a flavor of the mood at the white house. >> reporter: well, i think they're preparing for this fiscal cliff scenario to play out, wolf. but as you point out when we look back over the last three years, we've had these kinds of n
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)